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The Secret to Great Writing That Excites Readers

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The success of any writing—non-fiction book, fiction, article, or bog post--hinges on exciting the reader. No matter how good the content is...

The success of any writing—non-fiction book, fiction, article, or bog post--hinges on exciting the reader. No matter how good the content is, if the reader is not excited about it, they will quickly skim it and then forget it. If the reader feels some excitement about it, they will read it and then tell others about it. Getting you reader to talk about what you have written is the best—and cheapest—advertisement you can hope for.

For a writer, creating a sense of excitement in the reader is critical. How do you do that?

First, I have to make a disclosure. I not yet written a book, or a blog post for that matter, that excites the reader, and I do not consider myself an expert on this subject. That is why I am thinking about this. I am asking, how do you write to create an excited reader? I would love some advice. Still, even though I am no expert, I have come up with some ideas of my own.

Here are my five steps to exciting writing:


  1. Good content
  2. Make it easy for the reader to understand
  3. Develop a readable writing style
  4. Explain why it matters
  5. Create some drama

I believe step one, two and three are obvious. Step one simply means having something useful—from the readers point of view—to say. Step two is all about organization. Organize your writing so the reader can follow it and comprehend it. And three simply means developing a relaxed style. It is step four and five that I mostly wish to talk about. I believe they are the lynch pin when it comes to exciting the reader. Step one, two and three are only necessary conditions.

It is step four and five that creates excitement in the reader. Convince the reader that what you are writing about matters to him, and convince the reader that it is important, and they will read your words, word for word. If the reader is not sure why it matters, then they will simply skim.

A piece of writing should first, and quickly, explain what it is about. It should secondly explaining why it matters. Often both can be done at the same time.

A book, I think, should constantly, in each chapter, find ways to explain why the material being presented matters. Otherwise, because a book is so long, the reader will forget. An article should also explain its importance, but maybe only once or twice, depending on the length of the article. If you do not do this, you risk losing the reader. These reminders should not be obvious and they should not lecture the reader, but you should plant them here and there.

Even in fiction, it is important for the reader to know why it matters. Of course, fiction is not real. But in the world of the story, why does it all matter? What happens if the character fails? Can you imagine how boring a novel would be if you did not understand why the characters were doing what they were doing and why it mattered?

Next we come to creating drama. If telling the reader why your writing is important convinces the reader they should read your writing, creating a little drama makes it fun. My use of the word “drama” might give you the wrong idea as to what I mean. I am not saying every book, fiction or non-fiction, has to read like an action novel, nor am I saying you have to include a lot of real life examples. By drama I simply mean not telling the reader everything at once. If you have something to explain to the reader, build your explanation step-by-step, and make liberal use of foreshadowing. Even in non-fiction, you can hint at the importance of the ideas to come and what those ideas might be.

Can writing great books and articles be that easy? I doubt it. I’m sure there are secrets to great writing that I do not understand. But I do feel these five steps are a good start.

Consider This:

No one is useless in this world who lightens the burden of it for anyone else. -Charles Dickens, novelist (1812-1870)

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The Evolving Monkey : The Secret to Great Writing That Excites Readers
The Secret to Great Writing That Excites Readers
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https://www.evolving-monkey.com/2014/09/the-secret-to-great-writing-that.html
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